Archive for February, 2015


Posted on February 15, 2015 - by

Here’s What They’re Saying About DEATH WITH ALL THE TRIMMINGS

Burdette infuses the mystery with Key West spirit and holiday fun along with delicious food references and recipes. This strong series continues a unique blend of island mayhem and sparkling characters surrounding a layered mystery. Fans of Julie Hyzy and Laura Childs may also enjoy.
— Amy Alessio, Booklist December 2114

From Fresh Fiction: DEATH WITH ALL THE TRIMMINGS is just sheer fun. This is my first time reading the Lucy Burdette series, but I’ve already downloaded the first book to my Kindle as I want to visit more with the quirky and oh-so-likeable characters. The twists and turns keep the reader guessing until the very end as Lucy Burdette serves up a spectacular mystery.

A contemporary comedy of manners sprinkled with gastronomical glitter, delectable danger and good will, Death with All the Trimmings is delightful. Phil Jason, Florida Weekly

Burdette successfully blends murder with menus, furthers Hayley’s development and paints a loving portrait of Key West’s wackiness, including the town’s annual Dachshund Parade and the appearance of a Chihuahua flash mob. Her mix of food, felonies and fun is a tasty seasonal treat. Jay Strafford, The Richmond Times Dispatch

As the beleaguered chef in “Death with All the Trimmings” tells her staff: “Never forget the people who will be eating the dishes we prepare. They are what matters — they are eating the products of our care and love. If we cook with that in mind, our customers will feel it in their hearts.” Change this language to reflect novel-writing, and this is what Burdette does — she creates a product of care and love for her readers.  JennyKales.wordpress.com

“Like a spiked glass of eggnog or s’mores over a cold night’s cozy fire, Death with All the Trimmings is a holiday treat that any book lover should be pleased to find stuffed in their stocking or neatly wrapped beneath the tree.” Florida Book Review 
“Hayley may be a foodie, but she’s no snob: Burdette treats readers to mouthwatering descriptions of both elegant restaurant meals and take-out Cuban sandwiches. Burdette also includes recipes for six dishes featured in the story, including Scarlett O’Hara Cupcakes and spaghetti Bolognese. Juicy, entertaining and twisty without being gruesome, this is a perfect seasonal treat for readers who love both a turkey dinner and a good mystery.” —Katie Noah Gibson, Shelf Awareness, and blogger at Cakes, Tea and Dreams

I love when a book keeps me on edge and this one had me going right to the end. This fast paced and action-filled drama quickly became a page-turner, as I had to know what happens next. All the main characters had a role in this latest caper as Hayley’s search for the culprit hits a little bit closer to home. The author does a wonderful job in bringing Key West alive through her and Hayley’s eyes that puts me smack dab in the middle of all the action. This was a great read boasting great conversations, a lovable cast of characters, a feel-good atmosphere, and a warm and friendly place to visit and I can’t wait to see what Hayley and her friends next adventures are in this delightfully charming and entertaining series.  Dru’s Book Musings

The pace of the book keeps readers moving from one event to the next without any lag time to get bored. It is a delightfully fulfilling read, although you might end it hungry.  Story Circle Book Reviews

Although the series is technically a “cozy” — no foul language or explicit sex, killings that take place offstage — the Burdette books have a sophisticated tone that separate them from the pack. She includes subplots, such as editor Wally coping with his mother’s cancer, that never overshadow the mystery, but deepen our affection for the wonderful cast of characters who surround Hayley.” Joe Meyers,  CT Post


Posted on February 11, 2015 - by

Writing the Mystery Series

CAPA University


Posted on February 11, 2015 - by

Princeton University Alumni-Faculty Forum

“Food Obsessed in America?” alumni panel


Posted on February 10, 2015 - by

Road Signs

LUCY BURDETTE: I can’t resist one last travel blog–I swear I won’t become one of those boorish relations who shows interminable slides! But the road signs in Australia are so interesting–and graphic…

Drive on left in Australia.

never too old to try it! Even with hubby giving helpful tips

Kangaroo crossing.

We might have seen an endangered bandicoot, but he was too fast to capture on film.

We did however see an endangered tiger quoll

and then drank his beer to support his future

Wood hens on road. Mutton birds on road.

Endangered woodhen

We did see them both  but the mutton birds fly in at night to land on the beach and find their nests. We watched in awe!

They really mean it this time: Unstable cliffs you may fall and die

twelve apostles, great ocean road

Dangers everywhere.

Sometimes it’s better just to focus on the cute animals…

Nothing is quite ever what it seems–this one I just liked–true for life in general…


And here’s an article on the pros and cons of visiting Australia and New Zealand, with tips!


Posted on February 9, 2015 - by

Eight Rules for finding Decent Food–almost anywhere! @lucyburdette

LUCY BURDETTE:  Food matters deeply to my food critic character.  And to me too! If either of us get too hungry, we’re miserable–a poor state to travel in. After three weeks in Australia, we came up with these suggestions for finding good food on the road…
Mex and Co in Manly

1. Go where the lines are. We found this little Mexican place in Manly when we looked in the window and saw baskets of homemade tortilla chips and margaritas in mason jars. And then I remembered I’d seen it recommended on Yelp by a California girl–who would know better? We weren’t able to get in that night but believe me we showed up 15 minutes before opening the next night.

2. Which brings me to the law of converging suggestions. Try Yelp or Tripadvisor, but it helps if more than one person recommends, and also if you can get a sense of what kind of eater they are.


3. When desperate for something not too foreign or in doubt about the choices, go to the museum cafe.

Here are my hummus and olives from the Sydney Museum of Contemporary Art Australia.

Sydney Harbor

4.  Steer away from tourist traps on the main drag. Be leery of these recommendations. (For instance, I would never start with a restaurant right on Duval, though of course there are exceptions!)

But sometimes the food can be sacrificed if the view is good enough (e.g., the cafe outside the Opera House), even if the folks at the next table are a little annoying…

Parma at the Royal Mail on Spencer

5.  Try the local specialties. Parma turns out to be fried chicken with ham and cheese and tomato sauce baked on, which is a regional specialty in Melbourne. And we were crazy for the homemade curried mustard, too, at The Royal Mail on Spencer in Melbourne.

6.  Eat what’s local and fresh. (This was a flower bed planted with lettuce in Sydney!)

7. Ask people who live there. We went to Little Creatures in Melbourne on our nephew’s recommendation.

And then ran into the chef and waitress from the restaurant we’d visited the night before–we struck gold with their recommendations of roasted corn, pulled pork,

Little Creatures in Melbourne

and these decadent salted caramel-stuffed donuts–served warm with ice cream:).

Cait with Lucy

8. If you’re in a city, look for a foodie walking tour. In Adelaide, John and I booked places for a tour called Feast on Foot. Cait, a lively city resident, took us to six of her favorite spots where we tasted falafel and dolmades, duck tacos,

duck taco  at Mall Food

spoonfuls of incredible salted caramel, pork bbq buns, cupcakes and more.

And she gave us city history and a tour of street art, too–the best way to see Adelaide!

And here’s an article on the pros and cons of visiting Australia and New Zealand, with tips!



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